City of Somerville, MA
Urban Agriculture Initiative Blog

Posts Tagged: Vegetables

Growing gardens, grows communities
by guest blogger Kim Schmid

As I walk around the city, it’s hard not to notice the urban agriculture boom happening here. Pots of tomatoes, peppers, and basil grow happily in many a front yard. I’ve even seen corn growing in front of my neighbor’s house.That’s right, corn. In Somerville! Such a sight is so fantastic, that you just might need to stop, introduce yourself to that neighbor and let him know that his garden makes you happy.

I did.

As I notice all this wonderful growth, I find myself thinking not just about how these vegetables nourish the people growing them, but about how a tended and well-cared for space feeeeelllss better and brings together the people living there. Growing gardens, grows communities.

Here’s a sampling of the before/after pics I have seen while exploring Somerville. What spaces have you seen transformed? What is the story behind that transformation? Who have you met along the way?

Kim Schmidt is the program coordinator for the Somerville Urban Ag Ambassador program- a joint project between the City of Somerville and Green City Growers. She is also the volunteer coordinator for the Somerville Community Growing Center.

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GOOD FOOD MAKES YOU SMILE!

Shape Up Somerville’s Mobile Farmers’ Market travels around the city bringing affordable fruits and vegetables to locations across Somerville. This Saturday, September 28th, 2013, is this season’s final market day. It’s your last chance to stock up on local, fresh produce at cheap prices until January 2014.  And, they are giving away water bottles at the Clarendon/North St. Market! Read more about this awesome traveling market here.

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Somerville gardener Asher Cowan spent a little time watering his plot at the Allen Street community garden. During the summer, he grows enough vegetables to feed himself and his wife without visits to the grocery store. Yesterday, he filled two bags with his crops and rode away into the sunset on his bike. Nice.

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" in 1943... 20 million “victory” gardens (out of a population of only 135 million people), produced 40 percent of our fruits and vegetables. .." Can we get back there?

A great article considering an alternative to the American lawn obsession.

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Next time you come to City Hall at 93 Highland Ave in Somerville, MA, take a look.  We are growing some food up in here! Think you don’t have space or time for a garden?  We took advantage of the pedestals flanking the front entrance to install two container gardens, each measuring less than 20 sf.  DPW helped us get them secured and MCCue’s Garden Center in Woburn donated all the containers (old bulb boxes), the soil and the plants. (Thank you!) Employees take turns watering, weeding and harvesting during their lunch hours and the food is distributed throughout City Hall. With initiatives like Shape-Up Somerville and the Mayor’s Fitness Challenge, it only makes sense. Besides producing some great food, it’s a great way to get employess outside during lunch and away from the computer screen.  We’ve got tomatoes, beets, swiss chard, lettuce, peas, beans, herbs, edible flowers and even pumpkins!

Next time you come to City Hall at 93 Highland Ave in Somerville, MA, take a look.  We are growing some food up in here! Think you don’t have space or time for a garden?  We took advantage of the pedestals flanking the front entrance to install two container gardens, each measuring less than 20 sf.  DPW helped us get them secured and MCCue’s Garden Center in Woburn donated all the containers (old bulb boxes), the soil and the plants. (Thank you!) Employees take turns watering, weeding and harvesting during their lunch hours and the food is distributed throughout City Hall. With initiatives like Shape-Up Somerville and the Mayor’s Fitness Challenge, it only makes sense. Besides producing some great food, it’s a great way to get employess outside during lunch and away from the computer screen.  We’ve got tomatoes, beets, swiss chard, lettuce, peas, beans, herbs, edible flowers and even pumpkins!

Comments